Posted by: Ross Gardner | May 10, 2015

Well, it’s a start……

Last night I ran my new moth trap, properly, for the first time.  By properly, I mean switched it on in the back garden, went to bed and checked it in the morning.  I had tested it out before since I bought it, but this was what I considered to be the proper, inaugural trapping session.

As such, it is now time for me to report a veritable extravaganza of moths, large and small, all on show this morning.  Well, not quite… there was one  – but it’s a start!  The beastie in question is one Epiphyas postvittana, the so called Light Brown Apple Moth.  They are very small moths, hardly more than a centimetre long and one of those insects rarely given a second glance.  As with most things, they do however, have their own story.  They are actually native to Australia and were not recorded in the UK until 1936, when they were observed in Cornwall.  They have since spread across England and Wales and into much of Scotland and Ireland and can, if mild enough, be active at any time of year.  Not bad going for a tiny insect originally adapted for the Austalian climate.

Light Brown Apple Moth (Epiphyas postvittana).  Ross Gardner 2015.

Light Brown Apple Moth (Epiphyas postvittana). Ross Gardner 2015.

The trap did actually attract more than this single individual, but only just.  I noticed another Epiphyas and a rather fine looking Brimstone Moth did not take long to appear after nightfall.  These are attractive, bright yellow moths, common wherever the likes of hawthorn or blackthorn grow.  I indulged myself with a somewhat unorthodox shot of it. A rather less than modest start, but onwards and upwards and with balmy evenings of summer yet to come!

Eye to eye with a Brimstone Moth (Opisthograptis luteolata .  Ross Gardner 2015.

Eye to eye with a Brimstone Moth (Opisthograptis luteolata) . Ross Gardner 2015.

The moth trap in action!  Note the Brimstone Moth on the box and two very small brown micro-moths on the white.

The moth trap in action! Note the Brimstone Moth on the box and two very small brown micro-moths on the white.

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