Posted by: Ross Gardner | October 15, 2017

The Peak and Beyond

The Big Trip returns to England after a fine time indeed in Wales.  First stop the Peak District……

Chee Dale (scaled)

The Peak National Park – spanning the counties of Cheshire, Derbyshire and Staffordshire – is an area of contrast. To the north is a hard landscape, of gritstone moorland, where the Pennines rise and extend into the rugged spine of Northern England. To the south is a softer country, where rivers have cut into green hills, carving valleys and gorges into the yielding limestone rock beneath, such us here at the very lovely Chee Dale, through which the River Wye runs…..

Dipper (scaled)

…… and birds like the Dipper (Cinclus cinclus) glean their living. These are birds of swift-flowing rivers. They take their name from the habit of bobbing or ‘dipping’ on boulders and their sustenance from the small invertebrates in and around the water, even swimming fully submerged in pursuit of their prey. No upland river is complete without its Dipper.

Trough of Bowland - Langden 4 (scaled)

Moving further North and to the Forest of Bowland in Lancashire. This is the Trough of Bowland, with the Langden Brook winding its way beneath dark, heather-clad hills, a wonderfully remote and little-mentioned corner of upland Britain.

Malham Cove (scaled)

A short way north again and the larger expanse of the Yorkshire Dales National Park awaits, a splendid swathe of moorland and limestone hills, the latter scarcely more impressively exhibited than at the much-visited Malham Cove.

Malham Cove - limestone pavement (scaled)

This part of the county is famous for its areas of limestone pavement, curious looking rock-from of horizontal slabs of fissured stone. Its formation is the result of glaciers during the last Ice Age scouring away the upper surface of the land to expose the rock underneath. Once exposed this rock is then vulnerable to the weathering caused by naturally acidic rain. This is what creates the fissures (known as grykes) along weak points in the soluble limestone bed.

Harebell (and pavement) 2 (scaled)

These grykes provide niches for a range of often scarce plants. The Harebell (Campanula rotundifolia) may not be rarity, but was still no less of a delight to discover growing among the rock.

Grey Heron in river 2 (scaled)

Back south once again through the Peaks and again also to the wonderful River Wye and more close-encounters with its wildlife. This Grey Heron (Ardea cinerea) was the very image of stalking concentration, staring among the ripples of the ever-restless surface.

 

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Posted by: Ross Gardner | October 4, 2017

To the Hills

An exchange of the very fine coast of the Gower Peninsula for the equally superlative scenery of Pembrokeshire was a swap we were very happy to make……

Great Glasshouse 2 (scaled)

We were, though, only too pleased to divert to the excellent Botanic Garden of Wales on the way. It has many things that make it a worthwhile destination, among them the impressive Great Glasshouse……

Otter

…… but coming face to face in broad daylight with a wild Otter was, to say the very least, completely unexpected. I grabbed this shot whilst visitors walked behind me along the main path having just emerged from the gate house. Otters are known to frequent the lakes of the Garden, but to encounter one under these circumstances was….. well, a bit bonkers.

Cliifs near Manorbier (scaled)

On to Pembrokeshire and its own wonders. These curiously angular-textured cliffs stood over the waves a short walk from our camp for a few days at Manorbier.

Chough 5 (scaled)

The coastal cliffs of Pembrokeshire are stronghold for the Chough, the scarcest of the UK’s seven species of crow.

Rural scene - Stackpole (scaled)

The Stackpole estate is renowned for including some South Pembrokeshire’s most dramatic coastline. The varied landscapes that extend inland from the cliffs make for decidedly picturesque countryside.

Nant Egnant valley (scaled)

Heading north and the hills beckoned. Walking from the village of Ffair Rhos there is to be found wonderfully rugged and satisfyingly remote country. This is the ‘other’ Wales, outside of the National Parks and somewhat outside of the tourism-consciousness. It is a place of long walks and Red Kites.

Cwm Idwal (scaled)

Northward still and the lure of stunning mountain country of Snowdonia was always going to be to strong. We took a steep trail up from Lynn Ogwen from where this shot of the distant Cwm Idwal was taken.

Ffynnon Lloer 2 (scaled)

At the top of the trail the lonely tranquillity of Ffynnon Lloer was our reward.

Horseshoe Pass 4 (scaled)

We made to leave Wales with a certain reluctance and were well pleased not to have done so without experiencing the scenic splendour of Horseshoe Pass, near Lllangollen, as we went.

Toad on the doorstep 2 (scaled)

And seeing as there has been something of a low creature count with this set of Big Trip images, here’s a sizeable and rather excellent Toad (Bufo bufo) that surprised me outside the ablution block at our campsite in Felin Uchaf.

 

Posted by: Ross Gardner | September 24, 2017

Into Wales

August was to be the month for Wales, but not before giving our regards to the fair county of Somerset and seeing some interesting sites in a Bristol back garden……

Kilve

The Kilve coast was a ‘must return’ for us as we passed through Somerset. It doesn’t boast the tallest of cliffs, the prettiest of beaches or the richest wildlife, but there is something about it that just hits the spot for me. The cliffs are wonderfully revealing of their Jurassic geology and lean the weight of deep time as inspirationally as any part of the Jurassic Coast.

Bombus jonellus 3

And while in Somerset it would not do to neglect to visit the lovely of Exmoor National Park. The trail from Selworthy village takes in some fine woodland and colourful heather and gorse-tinged heathland. It also provided my first encounter with the uncommon Heath Bumblebee (Bombus jonellus).

Hedgehog 3 (scaled)

With family on the edge of the city, a stop in Bristol was also a must. It also allowed us to enjoy privileged and close encounters with some rather wonderful Hedgehogs. My sister can sometimes see as many as four at a time in her garden and which are most appreciative of the dried mealworms she puts out for them.

Wye Valley view 2 (scaled)

Into South Wales our first port of call was the Wye Valley. Either side of the eponymous river are to be found slope woodland rich in wildlife, including many uncommon species like the hugely declined Lesser Spotted Woodpecker we saw tagging along with a mixed tit flock……

Peacock 4 (scaled)

Into South Wales and our first port of call was the Wye Valley. Either side of the eponymous river are to be found slope woodland rich in wildlife, including many uncommon species like the hugely declined Lesser Spotted Woodpecker we saw tagging along with a mixed tit flock. Sometimes though, it is the thankfully common things that can quite simply take the breath away. What a beauty the Peacock butterfly is.

 

Then on to the Gower Peninsula, just south of Swansea…

Bishopston Valley - cave entrance 2

A place of surprise caves hiding underground rivers…..

Pwlldu Bay - approach 2 (scaled)

Verdant wooded valleys, like this one at Bishopston……

Rhossil Bay and Down (scaled)

and its fair share of spectacular coastline, such as here at Rhossili Bay.

Bottle-nosed Dolphin - mother and calf (scaled)

It was from the cliffs at Rhossili where we saw a privileged sight indeed. We were able to spend an hour watching this Bottle-nosed Dolphin and her calf.

Wales is indeed a place of many wonders.

 

 

 

Posted by: Ross Gardner | September 21, 2017

Westward Bound

After the delights of Dorset The Big Trip continued on the wonderful West Country (I may have got a little carried away with the alliteration there) of Devon and Cornwall……

Dart Valley nr Dartmeet (scaled)

A prominent presence in Devon is, of course, the splendid expanse of Dartmoor National Park. Amid the rolling moorlands and granite strewn hills are the gleaming gems of thickly wooded river valleys. The Dart Valley is particular stunning and somewhere that I am yet to do justice with a camera, although this hopefully gives some idea.

Trendlebere Down 3 (scaled)

We have visited the moors many times before and it was good to get to some areas new to us, such as (the soon to be rained on) Trendlebere Down.

Woodland Grasshopper 3 (scaled)

the Downs are a National Nature Reserve for good reason, given the rich variety of scarce wildlife, such as the Woodland Grasshopper (Omocestus rufipes).

Helford estuary from Tremayne Woods (scaled)

We were soon on towards Cornwall and our first stop near the Helford River. A walk through Tremayne Woods offered up all the usual sights and sounds a rich woodland habitats – the twitter of bird calls, the head-turning swoop of Silver-washed Fritillary butterflies. The sudden smell of the seawater before laying eyes on it is a most pleasantly counterintuitive combination. The scenic qualities of the two facets are pretty good as well.

Ogo-dour Cove 2 (scaled)

Cornwall is, of course, justly renowned for its coastline, not least here at Predannack on the Lizard peninsula…

Cornish Heath 3 (scaled)

The clifftops harbour a superb array of wildflowers, including the very localised Cornish Heath…

Rose Chafer 2 (scaled)

… and while the number and variety of butterflies offered a more noticeable clue to the wealth of small life, there were others creeping beneath them, like the decidedly splendid and not insubstantial Rose Chafer (Cetonia aurata).

Bodmin Moor - The Hurlers Stones plus Engine House 2 (scaled)

But Cornwall is not all about its coast. The granite hills of Bodmin Moor offer a very different flavour of the Cornish countryside, where the ancient histories of the Neolithic inhabitants and their stone circles stand alongside the more recent endeavours of the once thriving local tin industry.

Hartland Point cliffs 4 (scaled)

We headed east again but with time for another stop-off in Devon providing the opportunity to visit the superbly rugged coastline at Hartland Point.

Bank Vole (scaled)

It was here we met this slightly elderly and rather belligerent Bank Vole. It’s not all Gannets and Grey Seals around our coasts you know.

Posted by: Ross Gardner | September 18, 2017

A Surprise in the Garden

I recently wrote an article for the Botanic Garden of Wales website.  If you fancy a look, click the image…

Otter 2 (scaled and very cropped)

Posted by: Ross Gardner | September 12, 2017

Isle of Wight, The New Forest and Dorset

Still desperately trying to catch up with myself, so here is the next selection of Big Trip piccies.

It was to the Isle of Wight we headed next, somewhere renowned for its coastal scenery……

Coast Path near Chale - looking west (scaled)

… such as this sunny stretch near Chale.

The coasts are also rich in wildlife…

Cylindera germanica (scaled)

For the fellow creature geeks among you, there are many scarce invertebrates to be found, like the rare Cliff Tiger Beetle, (Cylindera germanica).

Pyramidal Orchid plus Burnet (scaled)

For the more aesthetically minded there are the lovely flower-rich cliff-top grasslands to admire, containing a host of wildflowers like this Pyramidal Orchid (plus Six-spot Burnet).

Back on the mainland a some time spent in the New Forest is essential.  This superb area is widely regarded as one the richest wildlife areas in lowland Britain, home to many wild creatures rare or even absent elsewhere……

Silver-studded Blue (scaled)

… not least the Silver-studded Blue. It was indeed a joy to this drastically decline species so plentiful around much of the heathland we visited.

Beautiful Demoiselle 2 (scaled)

Wonderful also were the dragonflies and damselflies. The most appropriated named Beautiful Demoiselle is a large species of damselfly especially associated with gravelly-bottomed streams and rivers. In the right light the shimmering wings turn to gleaming glass.

Heading west and the very far county of Dorset is another region with a jewel-encrusted crown of natural history wonders.

Bog Asphodel group (scaled)

The south of the county is rightly famous for its wet and dry lowland heaths. The latter provides a home to such rare reptiles as the Smooth Snake, scarce birds like the Dartford Warbler and many an uncommon insect. The former has its own suite of fascinating wildlife, including those dragonflies and damselflies that favour the acidic pools and plants like these Bog Asphodel that colour the bog-lands in summer.

The Fallow Deer and the Magpie 8 (scaled)

Deer are a fairly regular sight. We came across a heard of bucks loafing among the grass. A Magpie appeared and began to do its best impression of an Oxpecker. The deer welcomed its attentions, presumably relieving them of troublesome pests. They would always keep their eyes closed, lest they receive a wayward peck in the eye, but seemed to offer themselves for the opportunistic crow’s services.

Chapman's Pool (scaled)

Dorset also has some of the finest coastal scenery that I know.

Next… the South West Peninsula.

Posted by: Ross Gardner | August 24, 2017

Home and Away

Back down south and it was interesting, to say the least, to be in South East Essex (in other words ‘home’) and kind of not be ‘home’, in as much as we were still on The Big Trip and sharing our time at each of our ‘Hotel Mum and Dad’.  Whilst doing so I could visit those so very familiar and see them in a slightly different light……

White-letter Hairstreak 3 (scaled)

One of the most familiar of all to me is the Hadleigh and Benfleet Downs (now comprising much of Hadleigh Park). Among many special plants and animals that live there is the White-letter Hairstreak. They lay their eggs on elm and so suffered considerably with the advent of Dutch Elm Disease. A decent of coverage of suckering elm near Benfleet supports a good population of this uncommon Butterfly.

Bullfinch 2 (scaled)

Another special place in Essex is Fingringhoe Wick, an Essex Wildlife Trust nature reserve near Colchester. A number of once common birds that have declined greatly in recent times inhabit the Wick. These include the Bullfinch. These are birds so often glimpsed as they disappear into some scrubby thicket, flashing that characteristic white rump. It was something of a surprise, therefore, that I should see a pair, including this handsome male, sat out in the open beneath a visitor centre window.

View from the hammock (scaled)

Back on the road again and across the River Thames to Kent. We are very fortunate in that we have been given access to our friend’s private woodland not too far from Ashford. It was, I think, the hottest few days of the year and we found ourselves in the perfect, cool and shady location. Having slept out in hammocks, here’s the view from my bed.

Glow-worm - male (scaled)

The wood was naturally full of wildlife, a lot of which made reading by torchlight at bedtime something of challenge. It is not that surprising that this male Glow-worm should be lured to the light, given that the very perpetuation of their species relies of a fondness for glowing objects, although more specifically the bioluminescent rear-ends of the flightless females.

Dungeness 3

Before heading west, a trip to the oddly wonderful Dungeness was in order. It is a curious combination of strangely incongruous holiday homes, hectare upon hectare of shingle and a narrow gauge railway. It is also one of the most invertebrate-diverse areas in England which is why it’s a National Nature Reserve.

Viper's Bugloss (scaled)

In June it is a riot of Viper’s Bugloss blue.

Next time, following a brief stop within the borders of the South Downs National Park and the very lovely River Itchen at Ovington, The Big Trip goes abroad……. to the Isle of Wight.

Posted by: Ross Gardner | August 18, 2017

Edging Southwards

At last, another post on one of the worst kept supposedly active blogs on the internet.  Thank you, lovely readers, for hanging in there.  The stars of Wi-Fi and electricity have aligned once again, so I shall endeavour to get through some more images of the Big Trip.

After the splendours of Glen Coe we headed south west to the shores of Loch Sween.  It was here that we had our first taste of wild parking (doesn’t really seem quite right to call it wild camping)……

At Loch Sween (scaled)

The Big Blue Van goes wild.

Loch Sween 6 (scaled)

The lovely Loch Sween, the haunt of frolicking otters, drumming snipe and watchful Osprey.  Pine Martens too, but we only saw their poo – I shall spare you the photo.

Heading east again took us to the northern fringes of Glasgow to visit friends……

Campsie Fells and distant Loch Lomond (scaled)

…… and where a short hike on the way, up the Campsie Fells near Fintry, surprised me with distant views of Loch Lomond.

Southern Uplands 2 (scaled)

Further south the Southern Uplands of Dumfries and Galloway, while not embodying the raw splendour of the Highlands are stunning in their own right.

Wheatear - male 3 (scaled)

At the Red Squirrel Campsites (and yes, we did see one of the eponymous rodents there) we discovered the peaceful solitude of Glenmidge. Walks up on the nearby hills yielded a number of the usual upland/open country species, including this handsome male Wheatear.

With a special family birthday and previous artistic commitments (Lola’s wonderful pottery) we made our way back towards Essex for a spell, but not without reacquainting ourselves with a couple old favourites, namely the Lake District and The Peak District……

Ullswater (scaled)

The fringing woodland of Ullswater was alive with birdlife, including Pied Flycatcher, Willow Warbler……

Redstart 3 (scaled)

…… and Redstart, like this very smart male (and doting father), actually snapped in the Peak District, near Bollington. For the short time we watched him, he flitted agitatedly about a tumble-down drystone wall, refusing to reveal the presence of his precious brood and recipients of his beakful of caterpillar.

A brief stop in Essex and The Big Trips heads West………………….

 

Posted by: Ross Gardner | July 11, 2017

Due to my, shall we say, sporadic blogging during the Big Trip (due to hit-and-miss access to the internet and a Luddite approach to cutting edge mobile technology!) and bearing down as I now am on the splendours of the West Country, I thought a whistle-stop tour, for those who are interested, through the rest of Scotland and the North might be in order as I struggle to catch up with myself.

From the Loch of Lowes and its beaver we found our way to the Cairngorms…

Cairngorms from Glenmore (scaled)#

The Cairngorms are a very splendid range of mountains on the eastern side of the Highlands, a constant and towering presence over our base for a few days in Glenmore Forest Park.

Cairngorms 8 (scaled)

Their lofty elevations mean that the highest reaches are the haunt of many a creature closely associated with our montane habitats. This mountain pass – Lairig Ghru – echoed to the croaking calls of Ptarmigan (Lagopus muta – that so very hardy member of the grouse family) and did we hear the piping strains of that montane plover, the Dotterel (Charadrius morinellus), ringing out elusively above us as we ascended?

Ring Ouzel - male 2 (scaled)

The Ring Ouzel (Turdus torquatus) is less restricted to mountainous terrain, but is very much a bird of the uplands, weather mountain or moor.

Glenmore - native pinewood 3 (scaled)

Glenmore itself, while much planted with alien conifers, still contains remnants of beautiful Caledonian Pinewood. This indigenous woodland, dominated by native Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris), would once have covered vast tracts of the post-glacial Scotland.

With some deliberation on where to head next, the draw of the west was too strong.  Via a detour through the exceedingly beautiful Glen Affric we pitched up at Glenuig, a tiny village on the west coast…

Glenuig 2 (scaled)

The view from the van pretty much says it all.

Glenuig 5 (scaled)

It is a place of surprises, where the rugged hills may give way to verdant woodland and even the odd sandy beach.

Common Gull (scaled)

Being so used to seeing the Common Gull (Larus canus) as a wintering bird on the Essex coast at home, the appearance of the clean-cut, rather elegant summer bird took a bit of getting used to. Not seeing them for yourself and being accustomed to the more ruggedly attired winter gull, Seton Gordon’s (a 20th century Scottish Naturalist) description of “fairy-like grace” could seem a bit of a nonsense.

We hauled ourselves away from Glenuig and made for wonder that is the fabulous Glen Coe…

Glen Coe 8 (scaled)

Glen Coe is just magnificent mountain country, of which the pass of Allt Coire Gabhail is just a small and stunning part. It is the realm of Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos), which we have been fortunate enough to watch twice here.

Red Deer - Glen Coe 2 (scaled)

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) inhabit the glen occasionally allowing for excellent photo opportunities, like this stag developing his velvety antlers.

Loch Leven sunset 2 (scaled)

And the sunsets from the village……!!

Posted by: Ross Gardner | June 17, 2017

The Big Trip visits Beaver Country

Loch of Lowes (scaled)

Loch of Lowes, Perth and Kinross. Ross Gardner 2017.

The first port of call heading north out of Edinburgh was the Loch of Lowes.  The Scottish Wildlife Trust reserve here is justly well-known for its breeding Osprey, which indeed was a principle reason for our visit.  When chatting with a member of staff at the visitor centre we were somewhat surprised to hear that, along with a wealth of other wildlife, there are Beaver here too!

The formally indigenous Eurasian Beaver has been reintroduced to Scotland (as well as parts of Devon), after 500 year absences, having been hunted to extinction in the 16th Century.  Despite some concerns over negative environmental impacts as regards tree damage and flooding as a result of their dam-building activities, following an extensive trial they have been officially welcomed onto the British mammals list.  Their effects on the countryside are actually potentially hugely beneficial.  The gnawing and felling of trees is essentially one of nature’s own ways of coppicing and can favourable modify the wider landscape by helping to naturally create diverse habitats for wildlife.  Also, the dams which they build can help to moderate water flow and help to ameliorate the risk of flooding for human populations down-river.  There are apparently  now some 200 living happily in the Tayside area of Scotland, with others elsewhere in the country.

Imagine our delighted surprise when we managed to lay eyes on one of these huge rodents as it swam across the lock that evening.  We resolved to return again early next morning and were reward again for our 5 o’clock start with even better views close to the hide.  It was just a shame that in my continued getting used to the new camera I had it, without realising, on the wrong setting and so the photos aren’t what they might have been.  But hey-ho, it’s all about the experience – the pics are really just a bonus.

Castor fiber

Eurasian Beaver (Castor fiber) at Loch of Lowes. Ross Gardner 2017.

 

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